Increase in temperature = increase in insects

After a cooler than usual spring, we have finally had an increase in temperature and with that we have had an increase in insect visitors to our garden.

On a warm day I really enjoy just standing in the garden with my camera and seeing what insects are about. Many of them are too small or too fast for me to capture, but hopefully I’ll capture some of them soon. I have realised that many of us walk straight past a flowering bush full of insects and just assume that many of them are honeybees, but there are so many similar looking insects that are also pollinating the flowers. I really would love to learn them what they all are and know how they are contributing to the local ecosystem.

For several years we have heard cicadas chirping frequently in our trees, but the only one I ever spotted was dead in our dog’s water bowl. Last weekend my husband finally spotted one on a stake in our tomato patch. I watched it chirp for a while until it flew away.

A cicada on a stake in our tomato patch.
A cicada on a stake in our tomato patch.

There have been plenty of visitors to our Melaleuca tree in our backyard. Most of them have been our honeybees, which are probably very happy to only be flying a short way from their hive to collect nectar. However, there are plenty of other insects who are really enjoying it. One that looks very similar on first glance is the Native Drone Fly (Eristalinus punctulatus). It is only slightly shorter, but has similar colouring and hovers more than a honeybee does.

Native Drone Fly (Eristalinus punctulatus) on a Melaleuca flower.
Native Drone Fly (Eristalinus punctulatus) on a Melaleuca flower.
Insect comparison: European Honeybee (Apis mellifera)(top) and Native Drone Fly (Eristalinus punctulatus)(bottom).
Insect comparison: European Honeybee (Apis mellifera)(top) and Native Drone Fly (Eristalinus punctulatus)(bottom).
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